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2 edition of Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow found in the catalog.

Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow

J. D Helvey

Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow

by J. D Helvey

  • 52 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Defoliation,
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth,
  • Runoff -- Oregon

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby J. D. Helvey and A. R. Tiedemann
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research note PNW ; 326
    ContributionsTiedemann, Arthur R., joint author, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Forest Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination13 p. :
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13602367M

    Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow / Lewis, Robert E., - Maser, Chris. - Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) . - Maka, Jean E. - Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.) - Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment. Effects of Artificial Defoliation on Growth and Biomass Accumulation in Short-Rotation Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in North Carolina Robert M. Jetton 1, a, * and Daniel J. Robison 2, b 1 Camcore, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Campus Box , Raleigh, NC Cited by: 5.

    Article Assessing Pine Processionary Moth Defoliation Using Unmanned Aerial Systems Adrián Cardil 1, Udayalakshmi Vepakomma 2 and Lluis Brotons 1,3,4,* ID 1 InForest Joint Research Unit (CTFC-CREAF), Solsona, Spain; [email protected] 2 FPInnovations, Boulevard Saint-Jean, Pointe-Claire, QC H9R 3J9, Canada; [email protected] by: Resource concentration and associational effect on balsam fir defoliation. The four‐way interaction effect of year of defoliation, stand composition, conspecific plant dominance, and heterospecific plant relative dominance on the annual defoliation of balsam fir was significant (F 18, = , P = ); thus, we separately analyzed the Cited by:

    Defoliation height affects the magnitude of all these factors. Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.) are the two most common pasture species in Finland, but little is known about their response to defoliation height. In this study the effect of three defoliation heights, 3, 6 and 9 cm, on the regrowth rates of. PLANT RESPONSES TO DEFOLIATION: A PHYSIOLOGICAL, MORPHOLOGICAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION David D. Briske and James H. Richards Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX and Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA File Size: KB.


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Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow by J. D Helvey Download PDF EPUB FB2

Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow. Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type. Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow.

Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. Effects of defoliation by Douglas-fir tussock moth on timing and quantity of streamflow / By J.

Helvey, Arthur R. Tiedemann and Or.) Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PortlandCited by: 5. The spatial pattern of defoliation affected both initial rates of tussock regrowth and total growing-season aboveground biomass production. When leaves were removed low in the tussock (older leaves), regrowth was greater than after removal of the same quantity of foliage high in the canopy (younger leaves).Cited by: the effects of defoliation on the growth and mor-tality of white fir, as follow: a.

Mortality, over a five-year post-defoliation period, caused by both tussock moth feeding and attacks of other insects. Top damage due to defoliation. Growth reduction associated with different degrees of defoliation. How long reduced growth persists.

1. Chionochloa pallens, a New Zealand low alpine tussock grass, is an important food plant of the takahéPorphyrio hochstetteri, a rare endemic flightless uced red deer Cervus elaphus compete with the takahé for this resource.

The experiment reported here measured the long‐term rate of recovery of the grass after simulated severe deer grazing by means of a single Cited by: Outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth are cyclical due to effects of several natural controls.

At least seven species of parasitic wasps and a tachinid fly have been identified as parasites that are locally present. Caterpillars may be killed by general predators, notably spiders. A nuclear. Douglas-fir tussock moth mature larva (caterpillar) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect.

in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is not an introduced species. It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch.

Ornamental spruce. Defoliation during early spring, before plants have reached the third-leaf stage, exerts a negligible stimulatory effect on tillering (Olson and RichardsVogel and Bjugstad ) and negatively affects potential peak herbage biomass production (CampbellRogler et Size: 93KB.

comparative effect of defoliation versus pruning is, however, not yet fully understood, as even though much work has looked at the effects of intensity, frequency and timing of pruning and defoliation (Lennartsson et al.

), few studies have made comparisons within an individual tree species. Consequently, results would not vary due to damage. Defoliation by the Douglas-fir tussock (Orgyiapseudosugata (McDunnough)) moth resulted in a reduction of total tree reserve energy, in the form of starch, proportional to the intensity of defoliation.

An early review (Hibbert, ) on the effects of forest harvesting on water yield made the following generalizations: (1) reduction of forest cover increases water yield; (2) establishment of forest. cover (afforestation) decreases water yield; (3) response to Cited by: DETERMINATION THE EFFECT OF DEFOLIATION TIMING ON COTTON YIELD AND QUALITY J.

Cent. Eur. Agric. ()Table 1. Harvest aid effects on seed cotton yield and ginning percentage Seed Cotton Yield (kg ha-1) Ginning Percentage (%) Treatment Control (Unthreat) % 40 The effects of defoliation-induced delayed changes in silver birch foliar chemistry on gypsy moth fitness, immune response, and resistance to baculovirus infection.

Martemyanov VV(1), Dubovskiy IM, Rantala MJ, Salminen JP, Belousova IA, Pavlushin SV, Bakhvalov SA, Glupov by:   The effects of PPM on the radial, height and volume growth of Crimean pine trees were investigated by examining the increment losses for three defoliation intensities (groups).

PPM activity in Crimean pine stand was assessed through radial increment analysis of cores extracted at breast by:   The communication we observed between interior Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine in response to mechanical and insect defoliation of interior Douglas-fir suggests that the damage elicited a general Cited by: Pooled TNC Defoliation 2 Competition 2 Plant Part 2 Competition x Plant Part 4 ‘ TNC is a measure of % organic matter while Pooled TNC = %TNC x Biomass.

‘Defoliation by competition and defoliation by plant part interactions were not signiti. Alfaro et al. () reported that topkill proportions due to Douglas-fir tussock moth defoliation increased from 10 to 86 per cent in mature Douglas-fir stands as d.b.h.

increased from 10 to ghana journal of forestry vol. 2 effects of defoliation on pericopsis elata (harms)v an meeuw an by the leaf tying moth, lamprosema lateritialis hampson (lepidoptera: pyralidae).

s.k.n. a tuahene forestry research institute of ghana, university p. kumasi, ghana. Douglas-fir tussock moths are important defoliators of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. The insects cause serious aesthetic damage to Colorado blue spruce in urban landscapes.

Continued heavy infestations may cause death of the tree top. Effect of defoliation treatments on yield Commercial yield for each treatment is shown in Table 2.

In all the trials, control yields differed by a significant 66% (P defoliation, while these, in their turn, differed from those involving defoliation by %.Cited by: Relation of starch content to conifer mortality and growth loss after defoliation by the Douglas-fir Tussock moth.

Forest Science – Wiley E, Helliker B. A re-evaluation of carbon storage in trees lends greater support for carbon limitation to growth. New Phytologist –Cited by: several years following defoliation.

The exact effect of defoliation on tree growth and survival is influenced by the interaction of many factors including the severity, timing, and frequency of defoliation, initial tree condition, and presence of secondary insect pest and disease organisms. These factors must beFile Size: KB.